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How to Keep Teeth Healthy Naturally

Natural Toothpaste UK _Georganics
Posted in Content Beauty

Natural toothpaste and other natural oral care products can provide everything you need for optimal oral health without the unnecessary synthetic chemicals that many commercial toothpaste brands are laden with. Get our guide on how to keep your teeth healthy naturally, remove stains and brighten your smile using natural toothpaste and other natural oral care products.

Natural Toothpaste

Natural toothpaste is a great start on your journey to naturally healthy teeth. Whether you’re simply maintaining your daily brushing routine or trying to actively remove stains, there is a natural toothpaste to suit your needs. Search for key natural ingredients like peppermint essential oil, which has been found to be effective at killing anaerobic bacteria on your teeth (this is the type of bacteria that thrives in a low oxygen environment like the mouth and can cause gum disease). You could opt out of commercial toothpastes that contain fluoride, which over-ingestion of can lead to fluorosis1, and sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS), which can cause skin irritationthat may become an issue for sensitive gums, as well as increased chance of ulcers and further irritating current ulcers3. For additional whitening benefits, harness the power of activated charcoal for gentle surface stain removal.

Content loves 💚: Georganics Natural Mineral-Rich Toothpaste for a regular daily brush, effective tooth remineralisation and maintenance of the important enamel surface. In addition, use Sister and Co. Raw Coconut & Activated Charcoal Tooth Whitening Polish 3-5 times per week to further help remove stains and discolouration from the surface of your teeth.

Natural Dental Floss

While a little more labour intensive, a once-a-day flossing habit is a key step to minimising plaque buildup and brightening your smile. Roll floss under your thumb to control its position, then floss from the back of your mouth all the way to the front, being sure to get in between every little nook and cranny to keep even the hardest-to-reach areas clean.

Content loves 💚: Georganics Charcoal Dental Floss for an extra squeaky clean from the addition of natural charcoal fibre, candelilla wax and peppermint essential oil.

Oil Pulling

Also called oil swishing, the modern-day oil pulling is based off ancient ayurvedic medicine in India, at which time it was included in all healthcare prescriptions. Traditionally, oil pulling is swishing of an oil throughout the mouth for several minutes, sometimes multiple times a day, which is thought to minimise the risk of gum disease and improve overall teeth and mouth health. In ayurveda, oil pulling is believed to draw out toxic substances from the teeth and gums, thereby detoxifying the whole mouth. In addition to brushing with natural toothpaste and flossing, take your daily routine up a notch with 1-2 tablespoons of oil pulling mouthwash. Swish it around the mouth for 5-20 minutes – the longer you swish, the greater the outcome, we’ve been told. Georganics also recommend that for ultimate results, continue swishing until the oil has turned a milk white.

Content loves 💚: Georganics Oil Pulling Mouthwash in English Peppermint for an effective daily wash and minty fresh breath.

Eco Toothbrush

No natural oral care routine is complete without an eco-friendly toothbrush. On average, each person goes through four or more toothbrushes each year and millions of these end up in landfill in the UK alone. Bamboo toothbrushes are a well-known alternative to pesky plastics, providing a sustainable and natural toothbrush that can be recycled at the end of its life.

Content loves 💚: Georganics Soft Bamboo Toothbrush w Nylon Bristles for a regular brush that is soft enough to maintain enamel surfaces if used effectively. Remember to store your eco-friendly toothbrushes upright in a cup where they can dry out between uses.


Shop All Teeth & Oral Care | Read More: Natural Teeth Whitening


 

1. Browne D., Whelton H. & O’Mullane D. (2005). Fluoride metabolism and fluorosis. Journal of Dentistry. 33(3), 177-86.

2. Berardesca E. & Maibach HI. (1988). Sodium lauryl sulphate-induced cutaneous irritation: Comparison of white and Hispanic subjects. Contact Dermatitis: Environmental and Occupational Dermatitis. 19(2), 136-140.

3. Herlofson BB & Barkvoll P. (1996). The effect of two toothpaste detergents on the frequency of recurrent aphthous ulcers. Acta Odontol Scand. 54(3), 150-3.